Interrogating Whiteness: reading Austin Channing Brown’s “I’m Still Here”

By Sarah Hoenicke for Anomaly Michael Brown was killed just weeks before I began my junior year at a private college in Oakland, California. “Police brutality” wasn’t a phrase I’d considered within an American context. My parents homeschooled my eight siblings and me. Our access to TV, the internet, music, movies, and people outside our church’s … Continue reading Interrogating Whiteness: reading Austin Channing Brown’s “I’m Still Here”

A Time to Mourn

By Sarah Hoenicke for Anomaly This month, my plan was to write about two new books, both by white men with the first name John. I wouldn’t usually choose titles with such homogeneity. When I select books, it’s because I think they’ll add to who I am by exposing me to who I am not, and … Continue reading A Time to Mourn

A Gentle Visit

By Sarah Hoenicke for Anomaly “The visit was a liniment,” writes poet Alberto Ríos in “Coffee in the Afternoon.” A balm for the nerves of two people living in the world, A balm in the tenor of its language, which spoke through our hands In the small lifting of our cups and our cakes to our … Continue reading A Gentle Visit

The Many Homelands of the Mind

By Sarah Hoenicke for the Punch Two literary journals, in their recent issues, put together interesting perspectives on home and belonging Home. Homestead. Homemade. Homegrown. Homeland. Homesick. At home. To home in on—clearly, the concept of home invades much of our thinking, and so, too, our language. Home signifies interior; to be away from it, … Continue reading The Many Homelands of the Mind

On American War, Omar El Akkad’s Tale of the Second American Civil War

By Sarah Hoenicke for Gulf Coast Omar El Akkad’s fiction debut, American War (April, Knopf), envisions a second American Civil War, waged 2074 to 2093, again between South and North. The effects of global climate change have induced a mass-move inland as the coasts are lost to rising seas and frequent, massively destructive storms. The Southerners … Continue reading On American War, Omar El Akkad’s Tale of the Second American Civil War

Book Review: The Expense of a View by Polly Buckingham

By Sarah Hoenicke for the Masters Review Our current political conversation often revolves around the financial disparities rampant in American culture. Polly Buckingham’s recent story collection, The Expense of a View, hones in on the lives most impacted by the inequalities this gaping imbalance engenders. Buckingham tells the stories of the system’s most vulnerable—the ill, the … Continue reading Book Review: The Expense of a View by Polly Buckingham